1. Dear Drugs-Forum readers: We are a small non-profit that runs one of the most read drug information & addiction help websites in the world. We serve over 4 million readers per month, and have costs like all popular websites: servers, hosting, licenses and software. To protect our independence we do not run ads. We take no government funds. We run on donations which average $25. If everyone reading this would donate $5 then this fund raiser would be done in an hour. If Drugs-Forum is useful to you, take one minute to keep it online another year by donating whatever you can today. Donations are currently not sufficient to pay our bills and keep the site up. Your help is most welcome. Thank you.
    PLEASE HELP
    Dismiss Notice

Effects - Why does MDMA enhance dubstep/house/electronic music so much?

Discussion in 'Ecstasy & MDMA' started by zerxes, Jul 8, 2013.

  1. zerxes

    zerxes Newbie

    Reputation Points:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2012
    Messages:
    6
    Male from U.S.A.
    MDMA has long been associated with most forms of electronic music, because it all seems to sound so much better while we're on it. Now, for me anyways, it makes most music I listen to sound better, but it increases my enjoyment of dubstep and house in particular 100-fold. Does anyone know what makes these kinds of music so unique when it comes to MDMA?
     
  2. stevi

    stevi Silver Member

    Reputation Points:
    30
    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2010
    Messages:
    61
    Male from U.S.A.
    My thought is the euphoria you feel gets associated with the music you are listening to and you end up paying more attention to the music. I think dubstep and house can be a bit too repetitive when you first hear it and after listening to it on mdma and associating it with the euphoria it really helps to focus on the music. Another thing music is highly emotional and mdma increases your empathy plus bass feels awesome on mdma.
     
  3. Potter

    Potter Platinum Member & Advisor

    Reputation Points:
    11,580
    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2005
    Messages:
    12,539
    Female from U.S.A.
    The drug has influenced that music. DJ's interact with their audience and if the audience is all on drugs, it is going to filter that response. Most other genres of music don't really include that filter in their creation process, at least not to the same degree. Because of the fluidity in form of modern dancehall music, the artist is constantly tweaking their music to satisfy their audience, which they have a pretty commanding view of (as opposed to an orchestra that needs to follow sheet music and never sees who they play for)

    There's also a lot of drug use among DJs, that certainly must have some influence.
     
  4. Pyron

    Pyron Titanium Member

    Reputation Points:
    690
    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2012
    Messages:
    321
    Male from United States
    There are several well placed theories for why this is the case, but the biggest has to be the culture. EDM (electronic dance music) grew hand in hand with clubs and raves in the 80's because it is very well suited for what its name suggests: dancing. It provides a basic, usually heavy set bass rhythm that's easy to groove to. And since this culture was formed by the young adults of the time, having experienced childhood in the 1960's and 70's, it's not surprising that drug use went with all of this as well. After all, drugs and music go great together, and this had been understood and practiced for decades.

    But what drugs specifically? Well, psychedelics and cannabis often come to mind, first and foremost. The perceptual change often brings a whole new feel to the way music is heard. And of course, these were practiced, just as they are now. But the fact that EDM was associated with raves and clubs meant that such events would start after dark and go in to the early (or sometimes late) hours of the morning. And thus, people began to use cocaine and amphetamines in order to stay up all night with tons of energy and not a hint of fatigue in sight.

    And then MDMA showed up. Nobody really knew much about it. It was a brand new chemical, and was rarely seen or heard of outside of this scene. It's also important to appreciate the fact that there was no Internet to look it up on, and highly unlikely to be any easily accessible books about it, so it was passed on by word of mouth. What people knew was that it was special, something unlike the drugs abused in years past. It gave you energy and mental stimulation but didn't tweak you out like the other stimulants. It provided a mildly psychedelic experience but didn't trip you out like acid or shrooms. And probably the most iconic, it gave you a feeling of warm empathy and love towards everybody and everything. For a culture that was based upon the ideals of peace and love, this was the jackpot.

    And the style of EDM flows well with it. It is constant and reassuring, it doesn't get bogged down with lyrical content and intricate guitar solos. Don't get me wrong, I LOVE these aspects of rock music, but I don't wanna analyze a song like I would with weed or psychedelics. I want to FEEL it, the magic of being with all my friends in a place where mostly everybody not only understands exactly what I'm feeling, but is probably feeling it too. It's difficult to explain, but for me, there is some sort of underlying principle of EDM that I intuitively connect with. Like the core existence of life is somewhere in the music.

    Anyway, that's just my opinion, and it probably doesn't make much sense but I thought I'd contribute
     
  5. Booty love

    Booty love Silver Member

    Reputation Points:
    1,360
    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2013
    Messages:
    3,804
    38 y/o Male from Some Beach, Somewhere:)))))
    I think it enhances this type of music, most of the time because, the dj who created it was also on similar drugs when he did. So in a sense, your hearing the music just as the dj intended it to be heard. Also i think your hearing is much more in tuned to the many different sounds and beats, that can go into techno music.
     
  6. WillowOne

    WillowOne Newbie

    Reputation Points:
    526
    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2009
    Messages:
    239
    Female from U.S.A.
    Because dubstep is so noxious, you have to be on drugs to enjoy it!

    Sorry, had to say it. Personally, I was a huge fan of techno/electronic music long before the use of MDMA. Something about the surging beat and nuance of phrase in good trance just transported me.

    MDMA enhanced the enjoyment, but not beyond what I already loved about it. I choose now not to use MDMA but still can't get enough of the trance - NOT dubstep! :) it's too "angry" for me, and no chemical embellishment I think will change that. Electronica is just good, driving music that taps into a primal place in us, with or without drugs. Look at Native American or African drumming. It just puts you in that place.
     
  7. thirdeyelasik

    thirdeyelasik Silver Member

    Reputation Points:
    355
    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2011
    Messages:
    582
    Male from earth
    All of my friends used to listen to these styles of music while on MDMA and I never understood. It didn't enhance this music at all for me, it made me crazy hearing that same beat going umph umph over and over again. I always listened to Pink Floyd, Radiohead, King Crimson and others. I guess it enhances all music its just that MDMA came out at a time when when dubstep and house music were being played at every club in the states and in the UK. Therefore this music became synonymous with MDMA.
     
  8. Dapple

    Dapple Newbie

    Reputation Points:
    0
    Joined:
    May 7, 2013
    Messages:
    4
    Male from U.K.
    Doesn't it have something to do with beats per minute as well? There is an ideal amount which is very enjoyable after MDMA but which I never enjoyed before it and just found repetitive. It does enhance all music, but a repetitive fast beat seems to get the most benefit: a beat that's about as fast as you can realistically dance energetically to.
     
  9. baileyscheesecake

    baileyscheesecake Newbie

    Reputation Points:
    30
    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2013
    Messages:
    150
    Male from ireland
    Well, it does depend on the form of electronic music, too. You do have your super chilled out stuff which is better to trip to. I think it's because all music sounds better, but bass-lines are especially good, you want to dance so a beat is appreciated, this coupled with the fact that most club music is written to be listened to on E, the DJ is possibly on E, he is definitely feeling the vibe from the crowd (same as you) and remixing the tunes to accommodate that. However, I like that sort of music sober, too, but I certainly get how it can seem repetitive to people who don't really notice how repetitive all music is (no vocals to distract you, not in typical verse, bridge chorus style etc.) E takes away that knowledge that it's repetitive, you are too lost in it to care.
     
  10. zenchicken

    zenchicken Silver Member

    Reputation Points:
    236
    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2009
    Messages:
    399
    Female from earth
    Repetition. Constant moving & repetition goes well with the drugs effects.

    Also, the drug has definately influenced the music!
     
  11. InSearchofEuphroria

    InSearchofEuphroria Newbie

    Reputation Points:
    5
    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2012
    Messages:
    18
    Female from Canada
    Neuropsychopharmacology (2006), 1–10 & 2006 Nature Publishing Group

    Differential Contributions of Dopamine D1, D2, and D3 Receptors to MDMA-Induced Effects on Locomotor Behavior Patterns in Mice

    Victoria B Risbrough, Virginia L Masten, Sorana Caldwell, Martin P Paulus, Malcolm J Low and Mark A Geyer*,

    Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA; Department of Behavioral Neuroscience, Center for the Study of Weight Regulation, and Vollum Institute, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA


    MDMA or ‘ecstasy’ (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) is a commonly used psychoactive drug that has unusual and distinctive behavioral effects in both humans and animals. In rodents, MDMA administration produces a unique locomotor activity pattern, with high activity characterized by smooth locomotor paths and perseverative thigmotaxis. Although considerable evidence supports a major role
    for serotonin release in MDMA-induced locomotor activity, dopamine (DA) receptor antagonists have recently been shown to attenuate these effects. Here, we tested the hypothesis that DA D1, D2, and D3 receptors contribute to MDMA-induced alterations in locomotor activity and motor patterns. DA D1, D2, or D3 receptor knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice received vehicle or ( + /)-MDMA and were tested for 60 min in the behavioral pattern monitor (BPM). D1 KO mice exhibited significant increases in MDMA-induced hyperactivity in the late testing phase as well as an overall increase in straight path movements.
    In contrast, D2 KO mice exhibited reductions in MDMA-induced hyperactivity in the late testing phase, and exhibited significantly less sensitivity to MDMA-induced perseverative thigmotaxis. At baseline, D2
    KO mice also exhibited reduced activity and more circumscribed movements compared to WT mice. Female D3 KO mice showed a slight reduction in MDMA-induced hyperactivity. These results confirm differential modulatory roles for D1 and D2 and perhaps D3 receptors in MDMA-induced hyperactivity. More specifically, D1 receptor activation appears to modify the type of activity (linear vs circumscribed), whereas D2 receptor activation appears to contribute to the repetitive circling
    behavior produced by MDMA.

    Neuropsychopharmacology advance online publication, 19 July 2006
     
  12. joeshadow

    joeshadow Silver Member

    Reputation Points:
    35
    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2012
    Messages:
    50
    Male from U.S.A.
    I have listened to EDM since I was 13 (which was in the 90s) and liked it before I started using drugs (I had smoked pot a few times by then but that is it). I love it to this day sober. I think MDMA enhances all types of music. But EDM is really fun to dance too and house started to become a worldwide deal when MDMA was still legal. Do not forget that speed and LSD were also popular in the early rave scene (acid house ring a bell)?

    Plus MDMA is very popular among the jamband scene and MDA was found at Grateful Dead shows in the 70s (and MDMA started showing up in the 80s). Hell, Shulgin prefers classical music when he is testing a material.
     
  13. questforstarfish

    questforstarfish Silver Member

    Reputation Points:
    420
    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2009
    Messages:
    462
    Female from U.S.A.
    MDMA temporarily decreases our brain's ability to filter out the sensory input we would normally filter out (ie: how soft this blanket is, how bright the lights and colors are, and the many different subtle aspects of music), so we pick up on all the little subtle things we normally ignore!